An Eagle’s final bow

Senior+Giorgia+Cozzo+as+Roxie+Hart+during+the+opening+of+Chicago%2C+with+the+literal+smoking+gun+after+killing+her+secret+lover+and+starting+her+life+of+felony+fame.%0A
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An Eagle’s final bow

Senior Giorgia Cozzo as Roxie Hart during the opening of Chicago, with the literal smoking gun after killing her secret lover and starting her life of felony fame.

Senior Giorgia Cozzo as Roxie Hart during the opening of Chicago, with the literal smoking gun after killing her secret lover and starting her life of felony fame.

Senior Giorgia Cozzo as Roxie Hart during the opening of Chicago, with the literal smoking gun after killing her secret lover and starting her life of felony fame.

Senior Giorgia Cozzo as Roxie Hart during the opening of Chicago, with the literal smoking gun after killing her secret lover and starting her life of felony fame.

Tatum Thompson, Reporter

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Taft students performed in the spring musical Chicago High School Edition from April 3 through 7 in the Taft auditorium.

This was the final performance for senior Giorgia Cozzo (Div. 930), who has been involved with the performing arts at Taft since her time in the academic center. Cozzo plays Roxie Hart, a woman destined for the spotlight after finding fame for murdering her lover.

Cozzo does not only act at Taft. She has experience doing much more that goes into a production aside from actually performing. She has done things from planning choreography and character positioning by being a movement director, to helping run shows as an assistant stage manager.

Drama teacher and musical Director Bryan Wilson said that “anytime a student gets a chance to work on something in a different capacity, it helps them gain a better appreciation and understanding of how all the roles fit together.” Wilson explained that an actor’s craft improves when they understand elements of theatre beyond acting, and Cozzo agrees.

“When you understand how a director thinks, how a movement coach thinks, you understand how you can perform to the best of your ability to create a story,” said Cozzo. She feels that “those experiences [apart from acting] have really shaped who I am as a theatre artist.”

Cozzo’s six years in theatre at Taft have had moments of both teaching and learning. “It has been amazing to learn from my peers that are older than me, and also to be able to mentor,” said Cozzo.

Senior Faith Boske (Div. 927) has been in several productions with Cozzo and has been able to pick up on “so many good tips” from Cozzo, and she knows that “if there is every anything we need help with…[Cozzo] is definitely the person to come to.”

To follow her passion for performing, Cozzo plans to study theatre arts and speech pathology at Marquette University next fall.